Hollenhorst plaque in left superior temporal cilioretinal arterial bifurcation

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Erika Robinson, BS
Ryan Duong, MD
Yevgeniy Shildkrot, MD
Rebecca Sieburth, MD

Abstract

An 81-year-old man with noncontributory ocular history presented at the UVA Department of Ophthalmology Walk-in Clinic for sudden-onset transient scotoma in the left eye of 2 hours’ duration. He was found to have a Hollenhorst plaque at the left superior temporal cilioretinal arterial bifurcation (A-B). On examination, visual acuity was 20/20 in the left eye and 20/25 in the right eye. Fundus examination was otherwise normal, and there was no evidence of retinal tears or detachment, retinal ischemia, or venous channel irregularity. He was referred to cardiology for a follow-up carotid doppler and transthoracic echocardiogram, which revealed moderate stenosis of the left carotid artery likely associated with a cholesterol plaque. At 6-months’ follow-up, the patient remained without visual symptoms, and examination revealed that the Hollenhorst plaque had disappeared, with attenuation of the distal cilioretinal artery (C). At the most recent follow-up visit, several years after the first incident, he was found to have a recurrence of the Hollenhorst plaque in the inferior disc margin of the same eye (D).

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How to Cite
1.
Robinson E, Duong R, Shildkrot Y, Sieburth R. Hollenhorst plaque in left superior temporal cilioretinal arterial bifurcation. Digit J Ophthalmol. 2023;29(1). Accessed July 21, 2024. https://djo.harvard.edu/index.php/djo/article/view/317
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