Pediatric toy-related ocular injuries in the United States: a national electronic injury surveillance system study

Main Article Content

Sruti Rachapudi, BS
Mona Kaleem, MD

Abstract

Introduction
Although traumatic eye injury is one of the leading causes of visual impairment in the United States, there is limited information available. This study serves to evaluate the epidemiological trends, primary ocular diagnosis, and degree of injury severity in pediatric patients after a toy-related ocular trauma.
Methods
This is a cross-sectional analysis of data from the (NEISS-AIP) of patients that visited an emergency department during a 5-year window from January 1, 2017, through December 23, 2021, and had an injury that involved the eye and was related to toys.
Results
For the 1,439 toy-related ocular injuries identified (67.5% male, 32.5% female), the mean age of injury was 6.67 ± 4.36 years and the median age was 6 years. The largest proportion of injuries occurred in the cohort of age 3-5 years (28.5%). The most common toys associated with eye injury were battery-operated toys (22.4%), toy guns with projectiles (18.9%), unspecified toys (8.1%), unspecified balls (5.7%), unspecified toy guns (5.3%), and dolls, plush toys, or action figures (4.4%). Of the injuries, 59.3% were deemed minor anterior segment injuries, and 6% were deemed major anterior segment injuries.
Conclusions
The findings demonstrate that battery-operated toys and toy guns with projectiles are the most common causes of eye injury. Most injuries were minor, but a small percentage were severe. By identifying the epidemiological trends, primary ocular diagnosis, and degree of injury severity in pediatric patients after a toy-related ocular trauma, this study provides valuable information to help prevent such injuries in the future. Preventive measures such as age-appropriate toy selection and adult supervision during playtime may help reduce the incidence and severity of traumatic eye injuries in children.

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How to Cite
1.
Rachapudi S, Kaleem M. Pediatric toy-related ocular injuries in the United States: a national electronic injury surveillance system study. Digit J Ophthalmol. 2023;30. Accessed July 21, 2024. https://djo.harvard.edu/index.php/djo/article/view/1081
Section
Abstracts