Grand Rounds
  Most Recent Cases
  Dates of Case
  Type of Case
  Submit a Grand Round.
  Register with DJO to receive personalized updates.

If you're already a
member, please sign in.
A 66-year-old woman with extensive conjunctival melanosis
Digital Journal of Ophthalmology 2014
Volume 20, Number 2
May 8, 2014
DOI: 10.5693/djo.03.2013.12.002
Printer Friendly



Helen Merritt, MD | Orbital Oncology & Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Program, Department of Plastic Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas; Ruiz Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston
Mathieu Bakhoum, PhD | Orbital Oncology & Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Program, Department of Plastic Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas; University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
Matthew Sniegowski, MD | Orbital Oncology & Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Program, Department of Plastic Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
Bita Esmaeli, MD | Orbital Oncology & Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Program, Department of Plastic Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
History
A 66-year-old white woman was referred to the Orbital Oncology & Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery service at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for evaluation and management of new, extensive conjunctival pigmentation of the right eye concerning for a conjunctival neoplasm. The patient had been in her usual state of health until 5 weeks prior to presentation, when she suffered a mechanical fall onto a cement sidewalk, sustaining blunt trauma to the right side of her face and head. She had initially presented to her established local ophthalmologist 10 days following her injury complaining of right eye floaters. Examination by the outside ophthalmologist had revealed near 360-degree conjunctival pigmentation, most dense superiorly, in the right eye that had not been previously noted on routine examination 6 months prior. The patient was subsequently referred to our cancer center for evaluation and management of suspected primary acquired melanosis (PAM). The patient’s past medical history was significant for rheumatoid arthritis, coronary artery disease, and heart failure. Her past ocular history was significant for bilateral cataract extraction with intraocular lens placement.
top